h1

What is Trappist Monasticism? (Pt1)

January 14, 2008

subtitle_monasticism.gif
Since ancient times, people who seek to fulfill their spiritual calling have been inclined to leave all worldy beliefs and possessions behind, finding in their solitude a practice of simple life and peaceful devotion. The desert or the wilderness – uninhabited places of the unknown – are often used as metaphors in the life of the monastic.

Trappist monasticism is a way of life for men and women who practice this way devoted to seeking God and following Christ under a rule and an abbot in a stable community that is a school of brotherly love.

Monastic communities, both of men and women, offer the opportunity of freedom, refuge, education and stability. Opus Dei means the work of God. Manual labour and prayer are important elements of a monk’s life. A substantial spiritual heritage has been created through the lives and labours of monks and nuns over centuries. They have found expression in writing, chant, architecture, crafts and in the skilful management of their lands.

Notes:

1. “It is no longer I who live, but Christ who lives in me.”Galatians 2: 20

2. “As we progress in our monastic life and in faith, our hearts shall be enlarged, and we shall run with unspeakable sweetness of love in the way of God’s commandments, so that, never abandoning his rule but persevering in his teaching in the monastery until death, we shall share by patience in the sufferings of Christ, that we may deserve to be partakers also of his kingdom.” Rule of St. Benedict, Prologue

3. “It is true that explanations are owed, and therefore must be given. The monastery is so radically different from the “world!” Yet it is natural to argue that the monk is not so different after all, and to assert that he has a very definite role to play in the modern world, that he is part of the world, and that he is not useless at all.” – Thomas Merton

 

 

Advertisements